Digital History’s Audience, and Audience as Practitioners of Public History

Cohen and Rosenzweig, Building an Audience

This chapter was great for learning the most effective ways to promote your digital History project, and build an audience and a loyal following. The emphasis on historical communities is key. In my case my project would fall into the WWII community. This means that the best place for me to start building an audience is among those who share a passion for the same historical topic, WWII. It never hurts to reach out to those who operate sites, that are related to your own for promotion or suggestions to improve your work. Also pay attention to historical context such as anniversaries are current events that relate to your topic. Guest books (non-mandatory) also encourage interaction and return traffic to your site.

Elissa Frankle, More Crowd sourced Scholarship

The first thing that Jumped out at me about Elissa Frankle was her Job title. Frankle is education consultant at the United States Holocaust Museum, which makes me automatically interested in the Children of the Lodz Ghetto project. I learned about the Lodz Ghetto in Dr. Richard Frankel’s class, History 327:The Holocaust, a class in which I proudly earned an A. I also plan on making a visit to the United States Holocaust Museum one day. So this article was good for me. The main thing I took away from this article was to seek help from the right people for certain tasks. She makes a distinction between heavyweight and lightweight peer production. With the heavyweight appearing to be the more valuable of the two. The heavyweight peer production is that which comes from professional scholars and historians such as PhD. professors. Over the years I have developed good relationships with my professors here at the University at Louisiana at Lafayette, which can benefit me by asking them for suggestions on my presentation of historical content. Frankle also emphasizes that audience interaction and the facilitation of communication draws in return traffic.

Causer and Wallace, Building a Volunteer Community

The main thing I took away from this article was to seek help from the right people for certain tasks. She makes a distinction between heavyweight and lightweight peer production. With the heavyweight appearing to be the more valuable of the two. The heavyweight peer production is that which comes from professional scholars and historians such as PhD. professors and people like Elissa Frankle, who have specialized concentrations in historical scholarship. Over the years I have developed good relationships with my History professors here at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, which can benefit me by asking them for suggestions on my digital presentation of historical content. The Transcribe Bentham project showed how effective crowd sourcing can be when approached correctly.

 

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